243 results found for royal-society

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00:26:00

Climbing with adhesion

by Mark Kutkosky
Climbing with adhesion
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 5 years ago | 872 views
Rating:

Mark Cutkosky is Fletcher Jones Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford. Here he discusses climbing robots and how they can take their cue from nature.

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00:25:00

Physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming

by Ray Goldstein
Physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 5 years ago | 767 views
Rating:

Professor Ray Goldstein FRS is the Schlumberger Professor of Complex Physical Systems at the University of Cambridge. Here he describes a biological example of topological inversion, with relevance to engineering problems in human technology.

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00:32:00

Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages

by Florian Hollfelder
Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 913 views
Rating:

Florian Hollfelder is based in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. He is interested in mechanism in chemistry and biology. Here he describes using principles of natural selection to make functional proteins.

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00:33:00

Biomimetic adhesive microstructures

by Stanislav Gorb
Biomimetic adhesive microstructures
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 5 years ago | 922 views
Rating:

Stanislav Gorb is Professor of Zoology at the University of Kiel, Germany, with an interest in functional morphology and biomechanics. Here he discusses clustering as a form of self-assembly, and applications in adhesion.

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00:34:00

Bioinspired membrane-based systems

by Patricia Bassereau
Bioinspired membrane-based systems
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 775 views
Rating:

Directrice de Recherche Patricia Bassereau, Institut Curie Centre de Recherche Laboratorie Physico-Chimie, France, speaks on bioinspired membrane-based systems for a physical approach of cell organization and dynamics: usefulness and limitations.

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00:33:00

Crystals: animal, vegetable or mineral?

by Stephen Hyde
Crystals: animal, vegetable or mineral?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 847 views
Rating:

Stephen Hyde is Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and the Research School of Physics and Engineering at the Australian National University in Canberra. Taking the popular children's game as a starting point, he asks whether crystalli....

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00:31:00

Living Crystals

by Yuru Deng
Living Crystals
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 920 views
Rating:

Yuru Deng is an Assistant Professor at the National University of Singapore with a background in dentistry. Here she discusses the enigmatic functions of biological cubic membranes.

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00:24:00

Bioinspiration: something for everyone

by George Whitesides
Bioinspiration: something for everyone
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 757 views
Rating:

George Whitesides is the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University. Best-known for his work in NMR spectroscopy, organometallic chemistry, molecular self-assembly and nanotechnology, here he introduces sof....

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01:14:00

Cuckoos and their victims

by Nick Davies
Cuckoos and their victims
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 829 views
Rating:

The sight of a little warbler feeding an enormous cuckoo chick has astonished observers since ancient times. It was once thought that cuckoos were unable to raise their own young because of defective anatomy and behaviour, and so other birds were onl....

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01:10:00

Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life

by Jeff Errington
Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 770 views
Rating:

The cell wall is a crucial structure found in almost all bacteria. It is the target for our best antibiotics and fragments of the wall trigger powerful innate immune responses against infection. Surprisingly, many bacteria can switch almost effortl....

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01:31:00

Tackling the great challenges of the 21st century

by Various Presenters
Tackling the great challenges of the 21st century
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 979 views
Rating:

Sir Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society and Lord Stern, President of the British Academy, discussed the new opportunities – and need – for collaboration between the traditional academic disciplines to respond to the big issues of our time,....

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01:31:00

Ebola: inside an epidemic

by Various Presenters
Ebola: inside an epidemic
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 0 views
Rating:

Find out what we have learnt from the outbreak so far (March 2015) and what is being done to ensure continued resilience to epidemic scenarios.

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01:26:00

Women writing science

by Various Presenters
Women writing science
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 0 views
Rating:

Join us as we celebrate International Women’s Day by exploring the history of women writing about science.  How did early women scientists use writing in order to further their careers? In which ways were they limited by their gender? What influen....

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01:03:00

The Long Road to the Higgs Boson – and Beyond

by John Ellis
The Long Road to the Higgs Boson – and Beyond
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 0 views
Rating:

The discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s LHC accelerator in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations was the culmination of a decades-long search that had started in 1964 with the proposal of this unique particle, a signature of the origin of the....

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01:05:00

Continental loss: the quest to determine Antarctica’s contribution to sea-level change

by Matt King
Continental loss: the quest to determine Antarctica’s contribution to sea-level change
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 970 views
Rating:

For over 50 years scientists have been working to understand Antarctica’s contribution to sea level. For much of this time there has even been disagreement about if this massive ice sheet is growing or shrinking. In 2012, advances in data analysis....

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01:05:00

Is chemistry really so difficult?

by Andrea Sella
Is chemistry really so difficult?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 637 views
Rating:

Chemistry has progressed in a way few outsiders appreciate. It underpins many other sciences; from genomics and molecular biology, food and sports science, through to cosmology and planetary science. Why hasn't the public impression of chemistry evol....

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01:00:00

Statistical and causal approaches to machine learning

by Bernhard Schšlkopf
Statistical and causal approaches to machine learning
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 529 views
Rating:

This talk introduces the basic ideas of machine learning, and illustrates them with application examples. It argues that while machine learning and "big data" analysis currently mainly focuses on statistics; the causal point of view can provide addit....

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01:00:00

Harnessing the power of mobile phones and big data for global health

by Rachel McKendry
Harnessing the power of mobile phones and big data for global health
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 671 views
Rating:

Infectious diseases rank among the gravest threats to human health alongside global warming and terrorism. New strains continue to evolve every year and can spread rapidly. The consequences can be devastating. The 1918 Spanish flu killed an estimated....

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01:01:00

Genetic control and the mammalian radiation

by Duncan Odom
Genetic control and the mammalian radiation
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 689 views
Rating:

To grow tissues in our body two key types of DNA control how, where and when to build essential proteins. Recent comparisons of mammal genomes show that instructions coding how to build proteins are similar across diverse species. In contrast the gen....

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01:04:00

Communicating with light

by Polina Bayvel
Communicating with light
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 821 views
Rating:

Most of the data we generate and receive (whether emails, tweets, videos or mobile calls) are now carried by optical fibres, which use light to transmit vast quantities of information over trans-oceanic distances. The use of hundreds of wavelengths ....

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01:08:00

Writing wrongs – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

by Various
Writing wrongs – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 713 views
Rating:

What role do literature, science and policy play in protecting the planet? Fifty years since the death of conservationist Rachel Carson, we look at her masterpiece Silent Spring, and ask: "What have we learnt? Listen to our panel of experts: author ....

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01:13:00

Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery

by Nicholas Lydon
Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 716 views
Rating:

This lecture discusses how the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome provided the first example of a link between cancer and a recurrent genetic abnormality. This chromosomal translocation, which results in activation of the Abl protein kinase, re....

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01:01:00

How embryos build organs to last a lifetime

by Brigid Hogan
How embryos build organs to last a lifetime
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 613 views
Rating:

All the organs of our body originate from small founder populations of cells which multiply into complex structures. ÊAdult stem cells are used to maintain organs throughout adult life and to repair or regenerate them after damage.Ê Focusing on the....

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01:11:00

The Royal Society and science fiction

by Farah Mendlesohn
The Royal Society and science fiction
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 733 views
Rating:

The lone (mad) scientist is a common trope in science fiction, but hidden away is a fascination with secret and semi-secret societies who work for the future of all mankind. This talk will look at the representation of the Royal Society in science fi....

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01:02:00

Vesuvius: volcanic laboratory or miracle of divine intervention?

by Gillian Darley
Vesuvius: volcanic laboratory or miracle of divine intervention?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 647 views
Rating:

Commentaries on Vesuvius have, for some two thousand years, see-sawed between observers' fascination with the phenomenon, as an inexplicable expression of the earth's inner force, and the relationship of the unpredictable mountain to a religious popu....

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01:02:00

The importance of science: an outsider’s perspective

by Bill Bryson
The importance of science: an outsider’s perspective
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 744 views
Rating:

Award-winning author Bill Bryson speaks to Professor Jim Al-Khalili about his personal experiences and perspectives on science, from childhood and his school years, through to writing the highly successful 'A Short History of Nearly Everything' and e....

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01:06:00

Staphylococcus aureus. The biography of a bug sometimes super, most often not

by Hugh Pennington
Staphylococcus aureus. The biography of a bug sometimes super, most often not
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 633 views
Rating:

Thirty percent of us carryÊStaphylococcus aureusÊup our noses. Boils and infections after surgery bring it to our attention. Mutant clones are called MRStaphylococcus Aureus,ÊorÊMRSA. All these things make it important today.Ê Hugh Pennington CB....

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01:00:00

Women’s work: Dorothy Hodgkin and the culture and craft of X-ray crystallography

by Georgina Ferry
Women’s work: Dorothy Hodgkin and the culture and craft of X-ray crystallography
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 725 views
Rating:

The year 2014 was celebrated as the International Year of Crystallography. A number of successful 20th century women scientists, of whom the Nobel prizewinner Dorothy Hodgkin is perhaps the most prominent, achieved their distinction in this field. Wh....

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00:54:00

Francis Crick: anti-vitalist activist

by Christine Aicardi
Francis Crick: anti-vitalist activist
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 731 views
Rating:

In the course of his scientific career, Francis Crick changed research fields several times. In almost 30 years at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, he worked on protein crystallography, molecular genetics, developmental cell biol....

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00:59:00

It’s magnetic resonance – but not as you know it

by Lynn Gladden
It’s magnetic resonance – but not as you know it
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 740 views
Rating:

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in hospitals to image internal structure and blood flow within the human body. Research has shown that it is possible to harness these techniques to study non-biological systems, with many applicatio....

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01:09:00

The medieval science of light: uncovering meaning with an interdisciplinary methodology

by Tom Mcleish
The medieval science of light: uncovering meaning with an interdisciplinary methodology
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 1022 views
Rating:

Can science today learn from thirteenth century literature? In the Durham Ordered Universe project, an interdisciplinary team (physicists, medievalists, Latin scholars and historians of science) has engaged with the great medieval English thinker Rob....

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01:11:00

(Re)Inventing science publishing: the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

by Various
(Re)Inventing science publishing: the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 1077 views
Rating:

Philosophical TransactionsÊis the worldÕs first and oldest scientific journal. Still published by the Royal Society, it is about to mark its 350th anniversary, and was instrumental in establishing many forms and facets of modern scholarly publishin....

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01:08:00

The asymmetric Universe

by Frank Close
The asymmetric Universe
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 830 views
Rating:

Modern scientific theory describes a perfectly symmetrical Universe. A Universe in which matter is destroyed within an instant of its appearance and where nothing we now know could ever have happened. Human life itself seems to be lopsided, as the sp....

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01:02:00

Sir Henry Bessemer FRS: a life and a legacy

by Chris Elliot
Sir Henry Bessemer FRS: a life and a legacy
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 826 views
Rating:

This lecture aims to celebrate the bicentenary of the birth of Sir Henry Bessemer by reviewing his scientific and economic achievements in the context of his era, and also in terms of their ongoing impact on the world of today. As well as highlightin....

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00:59:00

Sisters in science: Hertha Ayrton, women and the Royal Society c.1900

by Claire Jones
Sisters in science: Hertha Ayrton, women and the Royal Society c.1900
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 881 views
Rating:

Although women were not admitted as Fellows until 1945, by the beginning of the twentieth century there were a number of female scientists working at the margins of the Royal Society and its masculine scientific elite. This talk will introduce some o....

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00:57:00

The teenage brain

by Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
The teenage brain
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 449 views
Rating:

Until recently, little was known about how the human brain develops. In the past 15 years, new technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled us to gain insights into how the human brain changes across the lifespan. Research has d....

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01:01:00

Incendiary science: fireworks at the Royal Society

by Simon Werrett
Incendiary science: fireworks at the Royal Society
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 579 views
Rating:

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, fireworks offered some intriguing possibilities for scientific research among the experimental philosophers of the Royal Society. What was the nature of fire? How did combustion work? Why did gunpowder exp....

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01:15:00

Physicians, chemists and experimentalists: the Royal Society and the rise of scientific medicine, c. 1600-1850

by Allan Chapman
Physicians, chemists and experimentalists: the Royal Society and the rise of scientific medicine, c. 1600-1850
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 620 views
Rating:

The period 1600-1850 saw fundamental changes in how we understand natural processes. Chemistry and medicine especially moved away from classical ideas of 'balance' and 'vital properties' - such as fire and water - to understanding nature as an integr....

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00:59:00

Everest, the first ascent: the untold story of the man who made it possible

by Harriet Tuckey
Everest, the first ascent: the untold story of the man who made it possible
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 806 views
Rating:

The conquest of Everest by a British team in 1953 has always been celebrated as a triumph of heroic leadership, team work and courageous climbing, but the vital role that scientific innovation played in the success of the expedition has never been wi....

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00:42:00

‘Sacrifice of a genius’: Henry Moseley’s role as a Signals Officer in WWI

by Elizabeth Bruton
‘Sacrifice of a genius’: Henry Moseley’s role as a Signals Officer in WWI
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1381 views
Rating:

Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (1887-1915) was one of the foremost English physicists of the early twentieth century. Probably best remembered for his immense contributions to chemistry and atomic physics in the years immediately prior to the outbreak o....

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01:00:00

The Great Melbourne Telescope

by Richard Gillespie
The Great Melbourne Telescope
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 560 views
Rating:

A joint project of the Royal Society and the British Association, the Great Melbourne Telescope was the result of both technical and organisational innovation in the design and manufacture of a large telescope. At the completion of its construction b....

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00:53:00

John Evelyn’s ‘Sylva’ and the origins of the modern sustainability discourse

by Ulrich Grober
John Evelyn’s ‘Sylva’ and the origins of the modern sustainability discourse
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 812 views
Rating:

The idea of sustainability has deep roots in practically all cultures of the world. The term itself, however, so familiar in today's global vocabulary, was shaped in the 17th century European discourse on timber shortage. Initiated by the newly-estab....

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01:02:00

Winning and losing the fight against infectious diseases

by Christopher Dye
Winning and losing the fight against infectious diseases
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 837 views
Rating:

Human infectious diseases will be eliminated and replaced by chronic ÒlifestyleÓ diseases as fertility falls, life expectancy increases, and populations grow older and wealthier. This is the standard story of the epidemiologic transition, but it is....

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01:02:00

NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around

by John O'Keefe
NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1140 views
Rating:

Learning about new environments or locating ourselves in familiar environments are some of the most fundamental tasks that the brain performs. Information is not stored in response to biological needs such as hunger or thirst but on the basis of cogn....

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00:47:00

From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes

by Frances Ashcroft
From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 896 views
Rating:

Whether you eat a whole box of chocolates or fast for the day, the pancreatic beta-cells ensure that your blood glucose level remains relatively constant by regulating the release of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Diabetes results when insul....

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00:44:00

Defining nature’s limits: Prosecuting magic in sixteenth-century Italy

by Neil Tarrant
Defining nature’s limits: Prosecuting magic in sixteenth-century Italy
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 814 views
Rating:

Magic and science have traditionally been considered to have little in common. Yet for many sixteenth-century intellectuals, including churchmen, practising magic was based upon highly sophisticated knowledge of the natural world. For ecclesiastical ....

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00:57:00

The popular reception of relativity in Britain

by Katy Price
The popular reception of relativity in Britain
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 820 views
Rating:

How did it feel to open a newspaper in November 1919 to be greeted by headlines about 'Light Caught Bending' and a 'Revolution in Space and Time'? Einstein's relativity reached a wide public audience in the context of social change. The theory's inte....

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00:55:00

Iron from the sky: the potential influence of meteorites on ancient Egyptian culture.

by Diane Johnson
Iron from the sky: the potential influence of meteorites on ancient Egyptian culture.
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 748 views
Rating:

Ancient Egyptian belief was frequently derived from observations of the natural world, where the gods were considered to control the forces of nature; and as a society, ancient Egyptians placed great value upon order and balance. So how would the app....

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