45 results found for history-of-science

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00:46:00

Paul Dirac and the religion of mathematical beauty

by Graham Farmelo
Paul Dirac and the religion of mathematical beauty
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 937 views
Rating:

For the great theoretical physicist Paul Dirac FRS, the importance of mathematical beauty was 'like a religion'. Although his first papers on quantum mechanics showed an acute aesthetic awareness, he first set out his principle of mathematical beauty....

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00:43:00

Ghosts of women past

by Patricia Fara
Ghosts of women past
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 889 views
Rating:

Dr Patricia Fara, Clare College, Cambridge.  "I do not agree with sex being brought into science at all. The idea of 'woman and science' is completely irrelevant. Either a woman is a good scientist, or she is not." So declared Hertha Ayrton over hun....

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02:00:00

Sir Andrew Huxley Memorial Lecture

by Various Presenters
Sir Andrew Huxley Memorial Lecture
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1192 views
Rating:

Sir Andrew Huxley, President of the Royal Society from 1980 – 1985, died on 30 May 2012. A memorial event in his honour will be held on 17 October 2012 at 6pm at the Royal Society. It will include presentations on various aspects of his scientific ....

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01:02:00

Heroes of science

by Roger Highfield
Heroes of science
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 807 views
Rating:

Scientists love them. Historians of science can't stand them. The view that science rests on the shoulders of heroes and on them alone cannot be defended. Nonetheless, the public are moved and inspired by the stories of astronauts who've risked their....

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00:49:00

Triangulating positions: Hevelius, Halley and the management of the open-sights controversy

by Noah Moxham
Triangulating positions: Hevelius, Halley and the management of the open-sights controversy
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 798 views
Rating:

When the decade-long argument between Johannes Hevelius, the Danzig astronomer, and Robert Hooke about the respective merits of plain and telescopic sights for astronomical instruments reared its head again in 1685, the resulting controversy threaten....

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00:54:00

Sir George Cayley (1773-1857), the father of flight

by Alan Morrison
Sir George Cayley (1773-1857), the father of flight
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1057 views
Rating:

This talk discusses Cayley's pioneering aviation work, and his roles as an inventor and as founder of the Royal Polytechnic Institution in Regent Street. Cayley's work will be related to the scientific and intellectual milieu of the day, and to debat....

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00:49:00

Hero or villain? Nevil Maskelyne’s posthumous reputation

by Rebekah Higgitt
Hero or villain? Nevil Maskelyne’s posthumous reputation
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 805 views
Rating:

Nevil Maskelyne, 5th Astronomer Royal and Fellow of the Royal Society, is today best known as the villain of Dava Sobel’s Longitude. This talk will, however, look further back and examine how Maskelyne has fared since his death in 1811, attempting ....

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00:30:00

Dream to reality?

by Susan Mossman
Dream to reality?
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 814 views
Rating:

Plastics pioneers had great aspirations for their new materials. Roland Barthes called plastics “a miraculous substance . . . a transformation of nature”. Serendipity, careful experimentation and entrepreneurial skills have all played significant....

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00:59:00

Teaching language to the deaf in the 17th century: the dispute between John Wallis and William Holder

by David Cram
Teaching language to the deaf in the 17th century: the dispute between John Wallis and William Holder
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 756 views
Rating:

In the early years of the Royal Society an acrimonious dispute broke out between John Wallis and William Holder as to which of them had been successful in the ÔexperimentÕ of teaching the deaf child Alexander Popham to speak. Using evidence from th....

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