52 results found for biology

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00:25:00

Physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming

by Ray Goldstein
Physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 4 years ago | 689 views
Rating:

Professor Ray Goldstein FRS is the Schlumberger Professor of Complex Physical Systems at the University of Cambridge. Here he describes a biological example of topological inversion, with relevance to engineering problems in human technology.

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01:14:00

Cuckoos and their victims

by Nick Davies
Cuckoos and their victims
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 4 years ago | 740 views
Rating:

The sight of a little warbler feeding an enormous cuckoo chick has astonished observers since ancient times. It was once thought that cuckoos were unable to raise their own young because of defective anatomy and behaviour, and so other birds were onl....

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01:10:00

Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life

by Jeff Errington
Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 4 years ago | 688 views
Rating:

The cell wall is a crucial structure found in almost all bacteria. It is the target for our best antibiotics and fragments of the wall trigger powerful innate immune responses against infection. Surprisingly, many bacteria can switch almost effortl....

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01:01:00

Genetic control and the mammalian radiation

by Duncan Odom
Genetic control and the mammalian radiation
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 623 views
Rating:

To grow tissues in our body two key types of DNA control how, where and when to build essential proteins. Recent comparisons of mammal genomes show that instructions coding how to build proteins are similar across diverse species. In contrast the gen....

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01:13:00

Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery

by Nicholas Lydon
Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 650 views
Rating:

This lecture discusses how the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome provided the first example of a link between cancer and a recurrent genetic abnormality. This chromosomal translocation, which results in activation of the Abl protein kinase, re....

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01:01:00

How embryos build organs to last a lifetime

by Brigid Hogan
How embryos build organs to last a lifetime
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 535 views
Rating:

All the organs of our body originate from small founder populations of cells which multiply into complex structures. ÊAdult stem cells are used to maintain organs throughout adult life and to repair or regenerate them after damage.Ê Focusing on the....

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01:02:00

NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around

by John O'Keefe
NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 1076 views
Rating:

Learning about new environments or locating ourselves in familiar environments are some of the most fundamental tasks that the brain performs. Information is not stored in response to biological needs such as hunger or thirst but on the basis of cogn....

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00:47:00

From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes

by Frances Ashcroft
From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 825 views
Rating:

Whether you eat a whole box of chocolates or fast for the day, the pancreatic beta-cells ensure that your blood glucose level remains relatively constant by regulating the release of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Diabetes results when insul....

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01:17:00

Genetics, epigenetics and disease

by Adrian Bird
Genetics, epigenetics and disease
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1253 views
Rating:

The human genome sequence has been available for more than a decade, but its significance is still not fully understood. While most human genes have been identified, there is much to learn about the DNA signals that control them. This lecture describ....

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01:08:00

Nobel Lives

by Sidney Brenner
Nobel Lives
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 2406 views
Rating:

An audience with Nobel prize winners John Sulston FRS and Sydney Brenner FRS, who talk to Sarah Montague of BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, about their lives in science and their visions for the future.

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01:34:00

Is biodiversity going the way of the Dodo?

by Various Presenters
Is biodiversity going the way of the Dodo?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1013 views
Rating:

Panel discussion with Professor Jonathan Baillie, Dr William Cheung, Professor Adrian Lister and chaired by Dr Susan Lieberman, as part of the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2011.  Right now one-fifth of the world’s vertebrates are classi....

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01:04:00

Molecular chaperones: how cells stop proteins from misbehaving

by R. John Ellis
Molecular chaperones: how cells stop proteins from misbehaving
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1745 views
Rating:

Proteins are the action molecules of all cells, and to function properly, protein chains must fold and assemble correctly. But each chain of every protein runs the risk that it will combine with one or more identical chains to form nonfunctional aggr....

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01:03:00

From bears’ winter-sleep to advanced antibiotics

by Ada Yonath
From bears’ winter-sleep to advanced antibiotics
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 903 views
Rating:

Professor Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel.  To facilitate instant recovery of active life once bears wake up from their winter sleep, nature provides ingenious mechanism based on periodic packing of their ribosomes, the cellular ma....

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01:04:00

Nature’s glass: half-full or half-empty?

by Andrew Balmford
Nature’s glass: half-full or half-empty?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 972 views
Rating:

Andrew Balmford FRS is Professor of Conservation Science at University of Cambridge.  The world’s governments failed to meet their pledge of reducing the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. Wild populations, their habitats, and the benefits they pr....

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01:07:00

Finding patterns in genes and proteins: decoding the logic of molecular interactions

by Sara Teichmann
Finding patterns in genes and proteins: decoding the logic of molecular interactions
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 962 views
Rating:

Dr Sarah Teichmann is based at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the University of Cambridge.  In the post-genomic era, high-throughput methods are providing us with a deluge of data about genes and proteins. What knowledge about biology do....

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00:58:00

The Zoological World of Edward Lear

by Clemency Fisher
The Zoological World of Edward Lear
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1022 views
Rating:

Clemency Fisher is Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at National Museums Liverpool. Edward Lear is most famous for his Nonsense Rhymes, such as “The Owl and the Pussycat” and “The Quangle Wangle’s Hat”, but he was also a talented zoological art....

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00:58:00

Regenerating organs and other small challenges

by Molly Stevens
Regenerating organs and other small challenges
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 7 years ago | 811 views
Rating:

A disagreeable side effect of longer life-spans is the failure of one part of the body – the knees, for example – before the body as a whole is ready to surrender. The search for replacement body parts has fueled the highly interdisciplinary fiel....

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01:05:00

Pandemic Influenza: one flu over the cuckoo’s nest

by Robert Webster
Pandemic Influenza: one flu over the cuckoo’s nest
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 9 years ago | 653 views
Rating:

Where do the pandemic influenza viruses come from and why did experts fail to predict the severity of the 2009 pandemic? However to date, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza has been much less severe than the 1918 Spanish influenza.

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00:31:00

Networks in ecosystems and financial systems

by Robert May
Networks in ecosystems and financial systems
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 9 years ago | 768 views
Rating:

This talk surveys our growing understanding of the relationships between the network structure of ecological networks ? both in mathematical models and in the real world ? and their ability to withstand disturbance, natural or human-created.

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01:04:00

Cloning, stem cells and regenerative medicine

by Ian Wilmut
Cloning, stem cells and regenerative medicine
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 9 years ago | 783 views
Rating:

Extraordinary opportunities to study the molecular mechanisms that cause inherited diseases are being provided by new methods of producing stem cells. Hear about not only the potential value of these new methods, but also how their development was pr....

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01:06:00

Our genomes, our history

by Gilean McVean
Our genomes, our history
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 9 years ago | 999 views
Rating:

Genetic differences between humans reflect the fundamental processes, such as mutation, recombination and natural selection, which have influenced our evolutionary history. Now that we can chart the genomes of many individuals, we are finding many su....

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01:17:00

Mammalian biodiversity: past, present, future?

by Andy Purvis
Mammalian biodiversity: past, present, future?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 839 views
Rating:

Beautiful and charismatic, mammals are biodiversity icons. But a quarter of mammalian species are now threatened with extinction, as ecosystems reel under the impact of a growing and ever more demanding human population. This lecture explores the his....

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01:06:00

Three score years and then? The new biology of ageing

by Faragher Richard
Three score years and then? The new biology of ageing
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 734 views
Rating:

Ageing is the single greatest challenge facing our society today. Recent breakthroughs have demonstrated that it is possible to combine a long life with the absence of age-related disease. Scientists at the forefront of this research will explain the....

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01:07:00

Genetic fingerprinting and beyond

by Alec Jeffreys
Genetic fingerprinting and beyond
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1221 views
Rating:

Professor Jeffreys will describe how DNA typing can be used to solve casework and will review the latest developments, including the creation of major national DNA databases that are proving extraordinarily effective in the fight against crime.

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01:00:00

The great ideas of biology

by Paul Nurse
The great ideas of biology
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 962 views
Rating:

Three of the ideas of biology are the gene theory, the theory of evolution by natural selection and the proposal that the cell is the fundamental unit of all life. A fourth idea is that the organization of chemistry within the cell provides explanati....

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01:00:00

Plasticity of the brain: the key to human development.

by Colin Blakemore
Plasticity of the brain: the key to human development.
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 848 views
Rating:

How do our genes program the complexity of our brains? Why is human culture so much richer than that of the Great Apes? And how has human cognitive achievement continued to accelerate, when our genetic makeup has changed very little over the past 100....

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01:02:00

Thinking like a vegetable: how plants decide what to do

by Ottoline Leyser
Thinking like a vegetable: how plants decide what to do
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 829 views
Rating:

Plants monitor a wide range of information from their surrounding environment. They combine information of multiple sorts, and respond in an appropriate way. In plants there is no brain, and the information processing is distributed across the plant ....

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01:12:00

Brain development and brain repair.

by Marc Tessier-Lavigne
Brain development and brain repair.
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 985 views
Rating:

The human brain is made up of close to a trillion nerve cells (or neurons), each of which makes connections with, on average, hundreds of other nerve cells, to form the complex neuronal circuits that control all brain activities, including perception....

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01:08:00

Engineered zinc finger proteins and gene expression

by Aaron Klug
Engineered zinc finger proteins and gene expression
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1222 views
Rating:

It has long been the goal of molecular biologists to design DNA binding proteins for the specific control of gene expression. The zinc finger design, discovered by Sir Aaron Klug 20 years ago, is ideally suited for such purposes, discriminating betwe....

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01:12:00

Deciphering disease: cells and disruption of their communication

by Dario Alessi
Deciphering disease: cells and disruption of their communication
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 882 views
Rating:

The human body may seem to be no more than a bundle of tissues and organs, yet the cells these are made from are capable of interacting, communicating and performing complex tasks. Our cells' capacity to interact in this way enables humans to adapt t....

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00:58:00

Stem Cells to Synapses

by Andrea Brand
Stem Cells to Synapses
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 835 views
Rating:

One of the goals of research in neurobiology is the repair and regeneration of neurons after damage to the brain or spinal cord. Before we can understand how to repair the nervous system we must first learn how the nervous system is put together.

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01:03:00

Structure and the living cell

by Iain Campbell
Structure and the living cell
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 870 views
Rating:

In this lecture Iain Campbell will discuss methods of studying the structure of molecules and cells and how they have advanced in the 350 years since early microscopes gave the first glimpse of single cells. He will show how modern methods are allowi....

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01:05:00

Microscopy goes cold: secrets of frozen viruses

by Tony Crowther
Microscopy goes cold: secrets of frozen viruses
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 977 views
Rating:

Viruses are a major cause of death and disease. Too small to be seen by light microscopy, they were first visualised about 50 years ago by electron microscopy. Dr. Crowther describes his work on the development of the methods and illustrates how he h....

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01:08:00

The Puppet Master: How the brain controls the body

by Daniel Wolpert
The Puppet Master: How the brain controls the body
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1100 views
Rating:

The effortless ease with which humans move our arms, our eyes, even our lips when we speak masks the true complexity of the control processes involved. Professor Daniel Wolpert explains how the brain deals with this and can perform optimally in the p....

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01:19:00

Beyond the human genome project

by Eric Lander
Beyond the human genome project
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1222 views
Rating:

Dr Lander and his colleagues have developed many of the key tools and generated many of the key information resources for modern mammalian genomics. Their work includes mapping and sequencing of the human, mouse, and other genomes. He was elected a m....

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01:09:00

Adventures in vascular biology

by Salvador Moncada
Adventures in vascular biology
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1057 views
Rating:

Thirty years ago it was thought that the endothelium, a layer of thin, flat cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels was inert. However, major discoveries since then have demonstrated that it is a highly metabolic organ involved in maint....

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01:05:00

Genes, worms and the new genetics

by Julie Ahringer
Genes, worms and the new genetics
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1028 views
Rating:

A surprising finding over the past 20 years is that all animals have many of the same genes and that they use them in similar ways to grow and develop. These similarities mean that much of what is learned about what genes do in simple animals such as....

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01:13:00

Magnetic brain stimulation and brain function?

by Alan Cowey
Magnetic brain stimulation and brain function?
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 806 views
Rating:

Like his nineteenth century contemporaries David Ferrier tried to reveal cerebral localisation of function by direct electrical stimulation of the exposed brain of animals. With some notable exceptions the results were disappointing and confined to t....

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01:08:00

Perception, deception and reality

by David Attenborough
Perception, deception and reality
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1310 views
Rating:

Sir David Attenborough delivers the 2003 Michael Faraday Lecture entitled: Perception, deception and reality

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01:15:00

Vision for knowledge: Knowledge for vision

by Richard Gregory
Vision for knowledge: Knowledge for vision
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 864 views
Rating:

An evolutionary development of perception is suggested - from passive reception to active perception to explicit conception - earlier stages being largely retained and incorporated in later species. A key is innate and then individually learned knowl....

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01:00:00

Science not stamp collecting? Botany from 1759 to 2059

by Stephen Hopper
Science not stamp collecting? Botany from 1759 to 2059
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 912 views
Rating:

Professor Hopper considers the vital role that the study of plant taxonomy and systematics has played in plant science. He considers, in particular, how these fields are transforming to meet the needs of 21st Century science as we address the challen....

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01:04:00

The origins of flowers

by Peter Crane
The origins of flowers
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 780 views
Rating:

Flowers are such a ubiquitous and familiar part of our modern world that it is easy to take them for granted. But as Darwin recognized, the exquisite details of their structure and appearance have been shaped by evolutionary processes over millions o....

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01:01:00

Is the Great Barrier Reef on Death Row?

by Charlie Veron
Is the Great Barrier Reef on Death Row?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1172 views
Rating:

Professor J.E.N Veron, the former Chief Scientist of the Australian Institute of Marine Science and widely regarded as the world's leading authority on coral reef ecosystems, presents the effects that climate change is having on coral reefs.

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01:23:00

We are what we remember.

by Eric Kandel
We are what we remember.
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 814 views
Rating:

n this lecture, Eric R Kandel considers the neural systems and molecular mechanisms that contribute to learning and long-term memory and discusses how our insights into memory storage are allowing us to understand various forms of age related memory ....

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00:33:00

Deep sea discoveries

by Jason Hall-Spencer
Deep sea discoveries
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 10 years ago | 2016 views
Rating:

Recent underwater images show that the deep sea realm of the British Isles is nothing like the monotonous expanse of mud that many people imagine. Spectacular coral reefs, once thought to be restricted to the tropics, are now known to occur in the ch....

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01:02:00

Reprogramming the code of life

by Jason Chin
Reprogramming the code of life
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 967 views
Rating:

The information for synthesizing the molecules that allow organisms to survive and replicate is encoded in genomic DNA. In the cell, DNA is copied to messenger RNA, and triplet codons in the messenger RNA are decoded in the process of translation to ....

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01:00:00

The new biology of ageing

by Linda Partridge
The new biology of ageing
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 780 views
Rating:

Research into ageing has been rejuvenated by the discovery of mutations in single genes that extend the lifespan of laboratory animals. Some of the signalling pathways involved, particularly the insulin/Igf-like pathway, have effects on lifespan acro....

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01:16:00

A molecular window into speech and language

by Simon Fisher
A molecular window into speech and language
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 1210 views
Rating:

Our capacity for complex speech and language remains one of the most intriguing aspects of being human. It has long been suspected that some answers to this enigma will be found buried within the genome. With recent advances in genetic technologies, ....

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01:01:00

Mapping memory: the brains behind remembering

by Eleanor Maguire
Mapping memory: the brains behind remembering
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 723 views
Rating:

Historically memory research has focussed on the hippocampus, a structure deep in the brain's temporal lobes. Damage to the hippocampus is known to have a devastating impact on the ability to form new memories as well as compromising recollection of ....

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01:08:00

Plant and animal communication

by John Pickett
Plant and animal communication
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 873 views
Rating:

Organisms of all kinds use signals comprising minute amounts of natural chemicals. The exploitation of semiochemicals is demonstrated with dramatic success in the management of pests and parasitic weeds in resource-poor East African cereal farming.

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01:08:00

From proteins to drugs

by Mark Pepys
From proteins to drugs
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 862 views
Rating:

The normal proteins which circulate in human blood are either known or presumed to have beneficial functions. However normal immunity and inflammation proteins can cause or exacerbate disease in addition to helping to resist infections.

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01:06:00

Decoding consciousness

by Geraint Rees
Decoding consciousness
for 18-22 and upwards,
Lectures | 18-22 and upwards | 10 years ago | 845 views
Rating:

Everything we know about the world comes to us through our brain. Yet for each of us our own conscious mental world of thoughts and feelings is isolated and private. Despite centuries of research, language or gesture remains the only way we can disco....

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