22 results found for biology

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01:14:00

Cuckoos and their victims

by Nick Davies
Cuckoos and their victims
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 755 views
Rating:

The sight of a little warbler feeding an enormous cuckoo chick has astonished observers since ancient times. It was once thought that cuckoos were unable to raise their own young because of defective anatomy and behaviour, and so other birds were onl....

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01:10:00

Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life

by Jeff Errington
Bacterial cell walls, antibiotics and the origins of life
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 708 views
Rating:

The cell wall is a crucial structure found in almost all bacteria. It is the target for our best antibiotics and fragments of the wall trigger powerful innate immune responses against infection. Surprisingly, many bacteria can switch almost effortl....

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01:01:00

Genetic control and the mammalian radiation

by Duncan Odom
Genetic control and the mammalian radiation
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 637 views
Rating:

To grow tissues in our body two key types of DNA control how, where and when to build essential proteins. Recent comparisons of mammal genomes show that instructions coding how to build proteins are similar across diverse species. In contrast the gen....

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01:13:00

Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery

by Nicholas Lydon
Targeting the human kinome: cancer drug discovery
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 5 years ago | 663 views
Rating:

This lecture discusses how the discovery of the Philadelphia chromosome provided the first example of a link between cancer and a recurrent genetic abnormality. This chromosomal translocation, which results in activation of the Abl protein kinase, re....

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01:01:00

How embryos build organs to last a lifetime

by Brigid Hogan
How embryos build organs to last a lifetime
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 552 views
Rating:

All the organs of our body originate from small founder populations of cells which multiply into complex structures. ÊAdult stem cells are used to maintain organs throughout adult life and to repair or regenerate them after damage.Ê Focusing on the....

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01:02:00

NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around

by John O'Keefe
NeuroNavigation: how the brain represents the space we live in and finds our way around
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 1091 views
Rating:

Learning about new environments or locating ourselves in familiar environments are some of the most fundamental tasks that the brain performs. Information is not stored in response to biological needs such as hunger or thirst but on the basis of cogn....

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00:47:00

From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes

by Frances Ashcroft
From bench to bedside: KATP channels and neonatal diabetes
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 6 years ago | 845 views
Rating:

Whether you eat a whole box of chocolates or fast for the day, the pancreatic beta-cells ensure that your blood glucose level remains relatively constant by regulating the release of insulin from the pancreatic beta-cells. Diabetes results when insul....

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01:08:00

Nobel Lives

by Sidney Brenner
Nobel Lives
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 2436 views
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An audience with Nobel prize winners John Sulston FRS and Sydney Brenner FRS, who talk to Sarah Montague of BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, about their lives in science and their visions for the future.

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01:34:00

Is biodiversity going the way of the Dodo?

by Various Presenters
Is biodiversity going the way of the Dodo?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Discussions | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1031 views
Rating:

Panel discussion with Professor Jonathan Baillie, Dr William Cheung, Professor Adrian Lister and chaired by Dr Susan Lieberman, as part of the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2011.  Right now one-fifth of the world’s vertebrates are classi....

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01:04:00

Nature’s glass: half-full or half-empty?

by Andrew Balmford
Nature’s glass: half-full or half-empty?
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 993 views
Rating:

Andrew Balmford FRS is Professor of Conservation Science at University of Cambridge.  The world’s governments failed to meet their pledge of reducing the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. Wild populations, their habitats, and the benefits they pr....

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00:58:00

The Zoological World of Edward Lear

by Clemency Fisher
The Zoological World of Edward Lear
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 7 years ago | 1037 views
Rating:

Clemency Fisher is Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at National Museums Liverpool. Edward Lear is most famous for his Nonsense Rhymes, such as “The Owl and the Pussycat” and “The Quangle Wangle’s Hat”, but he was also a talented zoological art....

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01:05:00

Pandemic Influenza: one flu over the cuckoo’s nest

by Robert Webster
Pandemic Influenza: one flu over the cuckoo’s nest
for 14-19 and upwards,
Lectures | 14-19 and upwards | 9 years ago | 670 views
Rating:

Where do the pandemic influenza viruses come from and why did experts fail to predict the severity of the 2009 pandemic? However to date, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza has been much less severe than the 1918 Spanish influenza.

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